March 1st: chemotherapy cycle one

The PET/CT scan results came back on 14th February. The comparison with November was startling. It means I’ll be having my first cycle of six chemotherapy sessions on March 1st. Before then I’ll be going back for a talk with one of the specialist nurses to go through the process once more. I’m also due to go back in to see the consultant to sign the consent forms for treatment. Then, a couple of days later, I’ll be punting off into the unknown. A heady cocktail of Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine and Prednisolone will be used. In later treatment cycles these will be joined by Rituximab. On the even-numbered cycles I’ll be having high dose Cytarabine, which means a hospital stay of a few days. I’ve never been hospitalised before.

When I heard the news, my overriding emotion was one of … excitement. Which quickly felt wrong, but as I’m new to all of this perhaps it was excusable. Being on watch and wait for nearly four years has been great. I’ve been able to do lots of things that I otherwise wouldn’t have done, but it has sometimes been difficult to cope with the waiting. Moving on to a phase where I’ll actually be doing something to address the lymphoma rather than waiting for it to get worse did, initially, seem exciting.

I’m anticipating that it will seem rather less exciting once the side effects of treatment kick in. Perhaps in much the same way that some people who voted to leave the EU are finding the prospect of blue passports exciting now, but will eventually come to realise that our time in the EU was infinitely preferable. (And didn’t actually stop us from having a blue, pink, green or polka dot patterned passport either).

Carrying on in a political vein, I’ve recently written to my MP. I’ve asked her what her government is doing to mitigate the impact of leaving Euratom for patients who, like me, rely on medical radioisotopes for diagnostics.

I’ve also asked her what her government is doing to mitigate the impact of leaving the EMA when it comes to the approval of new lymphoma treatments. As there’s no cure for MCL at present, but it appears that one may be on the horizon, delays in approvals of even a few months could be fatal. I’ve promised to publish her response here should she choose to make one, as it should be of interest to anyone in a similar position.

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