Whetstone FORTRAN benchmark: Raspberry Pi 3B+

Following the launch on 14th March, a shiny new Raspberry Pi 3B+ landed on my doormat yesterday. I purchased it from The Pi Hut for the princely sum of £32 + £2.50pp. I was delighted that it arrived the day after I ordered it, despite not having paid extra to guarantee delivery.

Naturally(+) the first thing I did after setting it up (and deciding on the somewhat unoriginal hostname of ‘custard’) was to install a copy of gfortran to compile and run the Whetstone double precision FORTRAN benchmark(*).

When I was a young programmer in the 1980s, the Whetstone benchmarks were acknowledged as being the standard for assessing general computing performance. I believe that they first appeared in the early 1970s, written in ALGOL. This was way before multi-core processors became the norm, so the benchmark doesn’t give a true reflection of the total computing power available on the Pi 3B+. It’s easy enough to multiply by four to get an estimate, of course, so I’m sticking with it!

Running on a single core, the Pi 3B+ performs the benchmark approximately 33% faster than the Pi 3B (an average over 10 runs of 530,348 KIPS vs 399,858 KIPS). Compared with the original (single core) Raspberry Pi (150,962 KIPS), the improvement in speed is around 3.5x (i.e. 14x, if it had been possible for this benchmark to use all four cores on the Pi 3B+).

Custard running the Whetstone double precision FORTRAN benchmark

Whetstone double precision benchmarks - Raspberry Pi 3B+ and predecessors
Comparing Raspberry Pi models using the Whetstone double precision benchmark (single core performance)

 

 

(+) Naturally for me, that is.

(*) My previous posts about this benchmark and the results on earlier Raspberry Pi models are here:

Raspberry Pi 3, Raspberry Pi 2, Raspberry Pi Zero and the original Raspberry Pi.

Your thoughts?