Transplant +161: Bloody neutrophils

Bloody neutrophils. Bloody absence of neutrophils, actually.

I’ve been feeling really good for the last week or so. Gnu has emerged from hibernation and I’ve racked up a hundred or so very pleasant miles in him across Derbyshire. I’ve survived a third PT session in the gym which involved a punchbag. Very cathartic. I managed a six-mile walk around the tramway trail at Calke Abbey on Saturday without ill effects and, good Liberal Democrat that I am, I’ve been out delivering Focus leaflets. So the call I got yesterday morning from the hospital was unexpected.

Calke Abbey
Calke Abbey – a view from the old driveway.

The conversation went something like this.

“Hello Mr. Holyoake. Are you feeling well?”

“Yes, very. Thank you for asking.”

“I’m calling about your blood tests. Your neutrophil count is low, so you’re very vulnerable to infection at the moment. Are you sure you’re feeling well? If you are feeling even in the least bit unwell you need to come to the hospital immediately so we can get antibiotics into you.”

“I’m feeling fine. I feel better than I have done since the transplant. (Pauses, while making sweary noises in my head.) How low are they?”

“Well, they’re at … 0.14. We need to give you a course of GCSF injections immediately …”

Anything below 0.5 is considered severely neutropenic. No salad, blue cheese or pâté for me for the next few days! I’d hoped that I’d left such concerns behind after finishing with chemo last year, but it appears that my optimism was misplaced. The hospital (and other SCT survivors) have told me that it’s not unknown for this to happen. I know from past experience that the injections will sort the problem out, in the short-term at least. I’m slightly less panicked today than yesterday about what will hopefully be a minor setback.

However, there’s another wrinkle in this story. GCSF (Filgrastim) injections are (as far as I’m aware) the only way to get a haematology patient’s neutrophil count back up quickly, to protect us from life-threatening infections. (With a neutrophil count of 0.14, pretty much anything could be a life-threatening infection.)

Because of this, Filgrastim is on the WHO’s list of essential medicines. It should always be in stock.

The hospital pharmacy were only able to dispense three of the five injections I need. The other two will have to be collected separately on Friday afternoon. If the medicine supply chain is already struggling, it doesn’t fill me with confidence that it will work at all in the event of a catastrophic no-deal Brexit.

Are you listening, Pauline Latham MP, and all of your fellow travellers in the ERG? (I know the answer to that question – it’s no.)

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Reader Comments

  1. Chris Edwards

    The Brexit disaster continues. When will those idiots admit they are wrecking peoples lives and call a halt to this ridiculous idea?
    Hope you can get the meds you need Tim.
    Best wishes.

  2. Gail

    Oh crikey. Someone should warn the ship of fools that the brine from a jar of olives has no known pharmaceutical properties. Even the most organised of preppers can’t do it alone 🙁

  3. Andrew Morrish

    To be feeling well, you must have been looking after yourself – the count will look better once Friday’s doses are in the mix. Lets hope it kick starts your system to do what it needs to protect itself long term too

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