Own a piece of bygone Spondon

Since I started publishing my father’s photographs of bygone Spondon, I’ve been delighted by the interest that they’ve attracted. I was recently contacted by Kaff at Cherrytree Picture Framers in Spondon who asked if she could create display prints from four of them.

Yesterday I saw the results of her efforts – and they’re truly stunning.

The blemishes which scarred the original slides and negatives have been skillfully removed. High resolution scans (rather than scaled-down images from this blog) were used, producing great quality prints.

The photographs are currently on display at 3 Moor Street, Spondon. Prints can be purchased in different sizes and frames.

Bygone Spondon at Cherrytree Picture FramersThe best way to appreciate the pictures is to go in person. However, if you’re unable to visit and want to take a closer look, the colour photographs are blemish-free versions of the first two in this post. The black and white photographs are featured here.

Ockbrook & Borrowash Carnival, 1977

An 8mm cine film of floats and marching bands participating in the 1977 Ockbrook & Borrowash Carnival. It was shot opposite the shops on Priorway Avenue. Corona soft drinks were still going strong (a wastebin with Corona branding appears 2s in). The Borrowash Mother and Baby club had clearly spent a lot of time and effort on their Magic Roundabout float (10s). The paddle steamer float that follows is equally impressive.

The dangers of open-sided carnival floats can be seen at 61s as the lawn tennis club lorry comes to a sudden stop. Despite this mishap, Ockbrook & Borrowash Lawn Tennis Club would seem to be celebrating their centenary next year.

But without me serving cotton wool balls into the crowd, fortunately.

Ockbrook & Borrowash LTC float, 1977

Buxton was closed

Last week I paid a visit to Buxton for the first time in many years. Self-styled as “England’s leading spa town” (although I’m sure Royal Leamington Spa may have something to say about that claim) the visit was a disappointment.

The Crescent and Pump Rooms remain under renovation, with the 2018 re-opening date given on the hoardings looking optimistic. A BBC news article published in 2017 suggests that it may re-open in 2019, 12 years behind schedule.

Buxton CrescentHowever, the site was a hive of activity when I visited, unlike at the Octagon. This is also undergoing renovation, with the Pavilion Garden’s website suggesting a “late summer” reopening this year. This seems a tad optimistic.

Buxton OctagonThe miniature railway in the Pavilion Gardens, supposedly open every day during the summer holidays was, you guessed it, closed.

Buxton Miniature Train

The Opera House is lovely from the outside and had its doors open, but was inaccessible due to an extended fire drill.

Buxton Opera HouseThe main shopping area is unusual as nearly all of the major high street banks and building societies (as well as some of the lesser ones) have a presence. The rest of the shopping area is unremarkable, with the former Grove Hotel at one end in a poor state of repair.

Grove HotelThe only redeeming feature of the visit was Charlotte’s Chocolates in the Cavendish Centre, next to the Crescent. Great coffee, hot chocolate and cake. The homemade chocolates proved too tempting not to buy as well.

Buxton should have more to recommend it by 2020 – but until then it’s probably not worth a visit outside of the festival.

Colour pictures of Derwent Dams in the drought of 1959

In 2017 I drove up to the Derwent Dams for the first time in several years. This afternoon as I was going through more boxes of slides that my father left, I came across these ones of the dams. They were taken during 1959, when a severe drought affected Central, Eastern and North-East England between February and November.

Ladybower Reservoir 1959

An almost empty Ladybower Reservoir, looking towards the Snake Pass.

Salvage

It looks as if this group may be attempting to salvage building materials that were exposed by the drought.

Village remains

The remains of one of the villages submerged to make way for the reservoirs.

Graffiti

Graffiti was clearly a thing in 1959. I wonder who Julie was?

Winifred graffiti

… and for that matter, who was Winifred?

Derwent Reservoir

A rather empty Derwent Reservoir.

Cine film of Riber Castle and Zoo, August 1969

As a follow-up to my last post, here’s a cine film taken by my father of a family visit to Riber Zoo on 30th August 1969. The castle building appears to be in a state of complete ruin – very different to how it appears now. By today’s standards, the zoo seems rather too cramped for the animals. The safety precautions for visitors also seemed lax, as evidenced by my brother sat on one of the enclosure walls at about 25 seconds in. There’s also a makeshift “These animals are very dangerous” sign 72 seconds in. However, the only thing I really remember about this visit was the unpleasant smell of the place.

Riber Zoo August 1969 from Tim Holyoake on Vimeo.

The visit took place as we were caravanning nearby at the Derbyshire Caravan Club’s Bank Holiday rally. Here’s the information sheet from the event. This has survived because my father kept a detailed log book of all of the caravan outings we had as a family between 1967 and 1976.

Derbyshire Caravan Club Rally - Information Sheet - Bank Holiday 1969

And finally, no log book entry would be complete without his own notes. I especially like the note of the routes taken to and from the rally. There’s also a very short cine clip of the hot air balloon seen at Crich in the archive.

Diary entry September 1969

Riber Castle, Derbyshire

The view from Lickpenny Lane, Ashover this morning. Riber Castle is visible just above the driver’s side front wheel. I remember it as a regular school and cub-scout trip destination in the 1970s. In those days, the ruins of John Smedley’s former home was home to a rather depressing zoo. The zoo closed at the turn of the millennium. More recently, Riber Castle has been the subject of a long running redevelopment project to convert it into apartments.

The view towards Riber Castle and the Heights of Abraham

B5023 Cowers Lane to Middleton

I filmed a clear run on the B5023 from Duffield to Cowers Lane in March. Today I managed a clear run from Cowers Lane to Middleton via Wirksworth. The weather was much better and the sky looks amazing. The video follows, but for those of you who are interested, this is what Croots Farm Shop on the route I filmed in March has on offer this week …

50% off chicken fillets

Cowers Lane to Middleton from Tim Holyoake on Vimeo.

Blatting along Snake Pass

Gnu did his bit for Derbyshire tourism by filming along the A57 Snake Pass last weekend. It’s beautiful. This is the stretch from the turning for the Fairholmes Visitor Centre near Ladybower Reservoir to Glossop. I must have been lucky – no sign of another vehicle in front or behind me (on my side of the road) for almost the entire 18 minutes or so it took to drive. I haven’t been along this route in years, so I was sticking faithfully to 49mph the whole way, rather than pushing the 50mph limit. And it’s too pretty at this time of year to go any faster of course.

The video (and my complete 120 mile route) follow, but here are a few stills from the journey if you don’t have another 18 minutes to spare …

Derwent Dam

What I’d been to see just before the video starts – the stunning Derwent Dam, completed in 1916.

Ladybower Reservoir

The view from the Fairholmes Visitor Centre turning, looking towards the bridge over the A57 Snake Pass and Ladybower Reservoir.

Trees

The early part of the route is heavily wooded – trees (and sharp bends) everywhere.

Moors

As the road climbs, the woods give way to beautiful purple heather moorlands.

Steep descent

The Snake Pass then descends steeply towards Glossop …

Glossop

… which is where my video ends.

Visit us in Derbyshire soon, and blat carefully!

 

Snake Pass from Tim Holyoake on Vimeo.

Route map for Derwent Dams And Carsington Reservoir by Tim Holyoake on plotaroute.com

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