What makes an accomplished negotiator?

There are few empirical studies outside of academia that have looked into what makes an accomplished negotiator. However, in 1978(*), Neil Rackham and John Carlisle of the Huthwaite Group conducted one that went beyond game playing. Their work compared the behaviour of a number of accomplished negotiators with ones rated merely average by their peers. They found that accomplished negotiators:

  • Spent twice as much time asking questions (20% vs 10%), and so presumably more time listening to the other party
  • Talked more about their feelings
  • Spent twice as much time ensuring that a common understanding had been reached
  • Used fewer arguments to support their proposals
  • When responding to a proposal, they made half as many counter-proposals

In addition, average negotiators made six times more statements that annoyed the other party than an accomplished negotiator.

Yesterday afternoon we got another glimpse of Theresa May’s preferred negotiating behaviour. Will giving her even more power on 8th June end well for anyone in the UK?

 

(*) The Rackham & Carlisle study is referenced in Hal Movius’ 2008 paper “The effectiveness of negotiation training”.